Past Fellows 2001-2012

HURI Fellows 2004-2005



Lilya Berezhnaya currently is a research fellow at Central European University, Budapest, where she earned her Ph.D. in history in 2003. She will spend four months at Harvard (February–May 2005) to work on the topic “Death and the Afterlife in Early Modern Ukrainian Culture.” Berezhnaya will study attitudes toward death and the afterlife as they were manifested in the Catholic, Orthodox, and Uniate cultures of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. The fellowship is funded by the Dr. Roman and Patrylo Moroz endowed gift in support of research fellows at HURI, and by the Oksana Czeredarczuk Folwarkiw Ukrainian Fund.

Bilenky
Serhiy Bilenky, a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Toronto, earned his kandydat degree in history in 2001 from Shevchenko National University of Kyiv. He will spend eight months at Harvard (September–April 2005), working on the topic “Eastern Europe in Search of a Nation: Romantic Nationalism and Imagined Communities in Ukraine, Poland, and Russia in the 1830s and 1840s.” He will examine how modern Polish, Ukrainian, and Russian national identities were constructed and mapped during the Romantic period 1830–1850. This fellowship is funded by the Ukrainian Studies Fund, Inc. endowed gift in support of research in Ukrainian studies at HURI, and the Ihor and Oksana Humeniuk Ukrainian Fund in support of research in Ukrainian history.

Chornovol
Ihor Chornovol currently holds the title of Researcher at the Ivan Krypiakevych Institute of Ukrainian Studies, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine in Lviv. He earned his kandydat degree in history in 1995 from the same institution. He will spend four months at Harvard (September–December 2004), working on the topic “‘Wild West’ and ‘Wild Fields’: The Frontier in American and Ukrainian History.” His research will focus on a comparison of Ukrainian and American history in the context of Frederick Jackson Turner’s theory of the “frontier.” This fellowship is funded by the Mr. and Mrs. Alex Woscob endowed gift in support of scholars conducting research on issues related to Ukrainian history.

Glaser
Amelia Glaser recently completed her Ph.D. in literature at Stanford University. From September through December 2004, she will conduct research on the topic “To Market: Jewish-Slavic Exchange in East European Literatures.” In particular, she will assess the importance of marketplace exchange in the literatures of nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Ukraine (Ukrainian, Russian, and Yiddish). This fellowship is funded by the Michael Novak endowed gift fund in support of HURI fellows.

Henry Hale, an assistant professor of political science at Indiana University, earned his Ph.D. in 1998 at Harvard. During the summer of 2004, Hale worked at the Institute on the topic “Ukraine’s Drive for Independence and Theories of Ethnic Politics,” focusing on the question of how much “identity” politics lies at the root of separatism, especially in Ukraine and Uzbekistan. Continuing this research in the fall of 2004, he plans to develop new theoretical insights into identity to explain how and under what conditions ethnicity matters in political events. This fellowship is funded by the Wolodymyr Smigurowskyi endowed gift in support of scholarship at HURI.

Papusha
Ihor Papusha is lecturer of philology at Ternopil State Pedagogical University. He earned his kandydat degree in literature in 1998 from Shevchenko National University of Kyiv. At Harvard, he will be in residence for eight months (September 2004–April 2005), conducting research on the topic “Ukrainian Literature in Narrative Perspective.” Comparative in nature, this study will address problems pertaining to the study of narratology in Ukrainian literature in both European and American contexts. This fellowship is funded by the Dr. Jaroslaw and Nadia Mihaychuk endowed gift in support of postdoctoral research at HURI.

Liudmila Sharipova is Sustasoma Research Fellow at Lucy Cavendish College, Cambridge University, where she received her Ph.D. degree in 1999. She will spend four months at Harvard (February–May 2005), conducting research on the single surviving manuscript of Petro Mohyla’s “Knyha dushi,” a rendition into Ukrainian of the famous work by Thomas à Kempis entitled The Imitation of Christ. Her hypothesis is that this study will yield deeper insights into Mohyla’s point of view on religious issues as he began his ecclesiastical career, as well as some of the broader applications by Ukrainian Orthodox literati of Western sources in the early modern period. This fellowship is funded by the Lubomyra Hladky endowed gift in support of visiting scholars’ research at HURI.

Stryjek
Tomasz Stryjek is adjunct professor at the Institute of Political Studies, Polish Academy of Sciences, where he received his Ph.D. in 1996. While at Harvard (September–December 2004), he will examine the broad issues of nation and nationalism by analyzing categories evident in twentieth-century Soviet social thought and in various theories of history developed by independent Ukrainian thinkers, including many in the diaspora. This fellowship is funded by the Mr. and Mrs. Alex Woscob endowed gift in support of scholars conducting research on issues related to Ukrainian history.

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